• Call us on:01386 553631
  • Emergency:01386 553631

Getting a Kitten

Handy info on caring for your kitten

Vaccination

  • Two injections are given, 21-28 days apart 
  • The youngest age to start the course is 8 weeks 
  • The earliest age to finish the course is 12 weeks 
  • Only healthy animals can be vaccinated 
  • Your kitten can be vaccinated with an all in one injection against Feline Calicivirus, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (both causes of Cat 'Flu), Feline Enteritis, Feline Leukaemia and Chlamydophila
  • Allow your kitten about 5 days to settle into its new home, before vaccination

Full immunity is reached one week after the second vaccination. Before this time, please keep your kitten away from any unvaccinated or unhealthy cats. A booster is required every year. 

Worming & Flea Treatment

Worming

There are two types of worms – roundworm and tapeworms. Nearly all kittens are infected by roundworms from their mother’s milk. You will not always see them in the faeces. Worms can cause loss of condition, diarrhoea and a round belly. It is vital to worm your kitten regularly from birth. We recommend Milbemax or Drontal. 
Recommended worming schedule: 

  • Every 2 weeks until 12 weeks old 

THEN 

  • Every month until 6 months old 

THEN 

  • At least every 3 months for the rest of their life 

More frequent worming may be necessary when there are young children handling the animal or if the cat hunts. Your cat will need regular weight checks as it grows to ensure an accurate dose is given. 

Flea Treatment

Prevention is better than cure where fleas are concerned. We recommend Frontline Combo Spot On from 8 weeks and 1kg weight. For younger or very small kittens, please consult a nurse or vet. 
Fleas often infest the animal’s bedding, carpets and soft furnishings. If fleas are a big problem, these areas should be treated with an insecticide spray. 

Please speak to a nurse for advice on purchasing a suitable product.

Microchipping

Cat collars are not recommended as cats can become entangled and injure themselves. We recommend microchipping. This can be carried out at any age. The microchip is in a capsule the size of a grain of rice and is implanted into the scruff of the neck.

When a lost pet is scanned, a code is displayed which allows it to be traced back to its owner. Our microchips are compatible with SureFlap cat flaps, a helpful way to keep the neighbourhood cats out, without the need for a collar. These cat flaps can be ordered from reception. 

Feeding

Cats naturally prefer to snack on small meals throughout the day and night rather than eat a small number of large meals. Kittens do not tend to overeat. Therefore it is usual to allow kittens unrestricted access to food. Alternatively 3 or 4 small meals can be offered a day. 

Feed a good quality complete kitten food until 6 months of age.

As adults, the number of meals can be reduced to two a day but most cats still prefer to eat multiple small meals a day. Adult cats will need their food intake restricting to ensure they stay a healthy weight. A good quality complete food contains all the nutrients that your cat needs. Adding extras can unbalance the diet and can create fussy eaters.

Insurance

We strongly recommend that all our clients take out Insurance Plans for their pets at the earliest opportunity. This offers peace of mind should your pet become ill. Before taking out a policy, please note: 

Check the small print and level of cover carefully. 

A lifelong policy will pay towards long-term conditions for the whole of the cat’s life. 
Some policies, often called annual policies, only pay for the first 12 months of treatment towards a condition. This is handy for problems that are solved quickly, like a broken leg. But please be aware that if your cat develops a condition that requires ongoing medication (like arthritis, diabetes or skin allergies), they will cover the first 12 months of treatment. After 12 months they will refuse further payments towards the condition, regardless of whether you claimed your money back or not. 

Policyholders must pay a certain amount toward each claim. This is called the excess and will vary between policies. 

Insurers will not pay out for conditions that were known about before the new policy was taken out or occurred in the first weeks of cover.

Socialisation

Handling 
Cats and kittens tend to prefer short bouts of handling and interaction. Kittens should be touched on all parts of their body including the face, ears, feet, legs and tail. They need to be frequently lifted and gently restrained. 

Playing 
Introduce your kitten to several toys. Variety is important – try toys that are noisy, move rapidly, or those that are feathery or shiny. 
Avoid encouraging your kitten to chase fingers. Fingers are not prey and you may want to stroke your cat without being attacked! 

Resting and hiding 
Cats need several places to drink and rest. They like places to hide such as a cardboard box on its side. They also like to rest in higher places such as on a shelf. 
Installing a Feliway diffuser will increase your new cat’s sense of security to its new home. 

The Cat Carrier 
Please choose a robust carrier, not cardboard. Ideally the box should be regarded at home as “part of the furniture” so that it doesn’t become a signal for a stressful journey - put some familiar smelling bedding in the cat carrier. Keep the carrier covered during journeys and at the vet’s waiting room 

Litter 
All cats prefer a fine grain litter material. It is useful to use the same type of litter that the kitten has been used to when with its mother. Cats prefer a covered litter tray, away from busy areas and other animals. 
Cats prefer not to eat near to where they toilet. 

Multiple Cats in One Household 
Cats by nature are solitary hunters. They will often live happily with relatives, particularly related females. 
Cats tend to be intolerant of outsiders, so please be aware that they are likely to become stressed if they are required to live with a cat to which they are not related. 

If your new kitten is going to live with another cat, please speak to a vet for advice on introducing them. The cats are more likely to get on if they do not have to share feeding, resting, drinking and toileting sites. They will need several places to eat, drink and rest. These each need to be in completely separate and private places.

Return to all

Practice information

Evesham Surgery (Counter Service & Appointments)

Back
  • Mon
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    Closed
  • Sun
    Closed

Emergency Details

Please call:

01386 553631
Back

Find us here:

23 Lime Street, Evesham, WR11 3AH
get directions with Google Maps
Back

Please call this number for emergencies:

01386 553631

Bredon Surgery (No Appointments, Open Surgeries Only)

Back
  • Mon
    9:00am - 10:00am and 4:00pm - 4:30pm
  • Tue
    9:00am - 10:00am and 4:00pm - 4:30pm
  • Wed
    9:00am - 10:00am and 5:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    9:00am - 10:00am and 5:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    9:00am - 10:00am and 4:00pm - 4:30pm
  • Sat
    Closed
  • Sun
    Closed

Emergency Details

Please call:

01386 553631
Back

Find us here:

2 Station Drive, Bredon, GL20 7HH
get directions with Google Maps
Back

Please call this number for emergencies:

01386 553631

Pershore Surgery (Open Surgery and Appointments)*

Back
  • Mon
    9:00am - 10.00am, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:30pm - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    9:00am - 10.00am, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:30pm - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    9:00am - 10.00am, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:30pm - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    9:00am - 10.00am, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:30pm - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    9:00am - 10.00am, 3:30pm - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    9:00am - 12:00pm
  • Sun
    Emergencies only

Emergency Details

Please call:

01386 553631
Back

Find us here:

The Old Well, Station Approach, Pershore, Worcestershire, WR10 2DB
get directions with Google Maps
Back

Please call this number for emergencies:

01386 553631